RSS

First let’s see, What is RSS? Why Use RSS? RSS is an acronym for “Really Simple Syndication”. Its syndication format for web content and a new way of getting fresh content update for your web pages and search engines. Many websites online and almost every blog, offer a feed of their content in RSS format. As RSS grows in popularity more publishers are likely to join in and offer their own RSS feeds. i would say that its important for SEO and users point of view. Now every dynamic website now a days has RSS feed but what about static pages. What if you have a static simple website. How will you offer update in the form of RSS feed for your static website? Here is a clean and simple solution.

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Mobile feeds distribution for all. Your content, your device, anywhere. BUZmob is a great way to read RSS on your mobile devices. Fast, sleek and useful river of news RSS aggregator. Reach All Mobile Users, Anywhere, Anytime. BUZmob is a mobile feed publishing service for user, media and corporate content publishers. It mobile-enables your content without forcing you to change it, and puts you in control of mobile feed distribution. BUZmob emphasizes ease of use and universal access. It taps the vast majority of mobile users, on any device or network. Mobile visitors to your site can read posts, submit comments and forms, view images and access videos (soon), irrespective of device type, mobile carrier, location or language.

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Do you bookmark too many websites? Developers, Designers, SEOs and many other IT guys bookmark many websites or store their URLs for future updates and to visit again for useful resources. The fact is; We store many websites addresses then we can actually visit daily and get updated. I have found a way of getting updated with many websites at the same time by their RSS. With this tool you can be instantly updated from any number of websites without even visiting.

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by on July 9th, 2007

rss-iconRSS is a format for syndicating news and the content of news-like sites, including major news sites like Wired, news-oriented community sites like Slashdot, and personal weblogs. But it’s not just for news. Pretty much anything that can be broken down into discrete items can be syndicated via RSS: the “recent changes” page of a wiki, a changelog of CVS checkins, even the revision history of a book. Once information about each item is in RSS format, an RSS-aware program can check the feed for changes and react to the changes in an appropriate way.

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