Online Security

Why Internet censorship? Many countries block different websites for several reasons. This directly affects education, information flow and sometimes even small businesses. Take an example of YouTube. Users watch tutorial videos on YouTube. Companies and individuals upload and share videos related to their business. Many individuals have started their own video channels to share what they have learned so that others can learn from them which can be any skill or even a tip to speed up computer. Blocking useful and popular websites is not a solution to anything. Its like taking away freedom. Sure, users can find other websites to share their stuff and videos on, but it will take a lot of time for those new websites to be able to fulfill requirements for all the internet community. Even established video communities can not compete with YouTube yet.

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Chat rooms, where many people gather for live interaction, are among the riskiest places on the internet – where kids are most likely to “talk” with strangers. Chatting has become one of the most popular uses of the Internet by everyone. There are many chat programs available free for the downloading and by visiting chat rooms, kids have the chance to meet and form friendships with children from all around the world. As fun as it sounds, it can also be dangerous. You can help make chatting safer for your children by being aware of the dangers. Always know what your child is doing when he or she is using the Internet. You can set parental controls to help make sure they don’t get into web sites intended for adults, but chat rooms are a different matter. Usually all you need to get into a chat room is an Internet connection, the chat program, and an identifying nickname. Some chat rooms are designed especially for children, but others are adult oriented and should never be visited by anyone under the age of 18. Here are a few guidelines to make sure that your child’s chat experience is a safe one:

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Sexting fall into the category of cyberethics. Sexting refers to teens sharing nude photos via cellphone or email, but it’s happening on other devices and the Web too at global level. The practice can have serious legal and psychological consequences. Sexting is not a new behavior; it is one that is accelerated by technology. As smart phones become more robust with the addition of cameras, video and internet capabilities, it’s easier to capture all manner of images and with a couple of quick clicks share them with another person or a group of people. As fast as technology changes and infuses our lives, laws and polices take a long time to catch up. In the case of sexting, when young people share intimate photos of others to embarrass, retaliate, or bully there had been no legal framework developed specifically to address the behavior. Law enforcement and prosecutors, left with few choices, have prosecuted for the distribution of child pornography for the sharing of images if people under the age of 18. If convicted, this could mean serving time in prison (5 years) and being registered as a sex offender for life.

In one case, a school administrator in Virginia was arrested and charged with possession of child pornography when in addressing a disciplinary problem in the school that involved a suggestive picture that was being sent around, he asked a student to send the picture to his phone and then put it on his computer. Technically this was a crime; it took more than a year, significant legal fees, and the near ruin of a person’s career.

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