XML (Extensible Markup Language) is a general-purpose specification for creating custom markup languages. The term extensible is used to indicate that a markup-language designer has significant freedom in the choice of markup elements. XML’s goals emphasize representing documents with simplicity, generality, and usability over the Internet. XML has been used as the basis for a large number (at least hundreds) of custom-designed languages. Some of these, for example RSS, Atom, and XHTML, have become widely used on the Internet. XML dialects (often packaged in archive files) are becoming the default file format for office-productivity software packages, including Microsoft Office, OpenOffice.org, AbiWord, and Apple’s iWork. Lets discuss advantages and disadvantages of XML.

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by on July 9th, 2007

We have reached a point where many pages on the WWW contain “bad” HTML. Many will fall, my friend. Talk about strict rules. Lets explore a little history of HTML and XHTML before we answer this ‘WHY’.

The Extensible Hypertext Markup Language, or XHTML, is a markup language that has the same depth of expression as HTML, but also conforms to XML syntax. While HTML prior to HTML 5 was defined as an application of Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML), a very flexible markup language, XHTML is an application of XML, a more restrictive subset of SGML. Because they need to be well-formed, true XHTML documents allow for automated processing to be performed using standard XML tools—unlike HTML, which requires a relatively complex, lenient, and generally custom parser. XHTML can be thought of as the intersection of HTML and XML in many respects, since it is a reformulation of HTML in XML. XHTML 1.0 became a World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Recommendation on January 26, 2000. XHTML 1.1 became a W3C Recommendation on May 31, 2001.

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XHTML is a family of current and future document types and modules that reproduce, subset, and extend HTML 4 [HTML4]. XHTML family document types are XML based, and ultimately are designed to work in conjunction with XML-based user agents. The details of this family and its evolution are discussed in more detail in [XHTMLMOD].

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Simply put web hosting, or web site hosting, is the process of creating an internet web site and allowing others around the world to view the web site. A web hosting provider is basically a business which rents space on its computers (commonly these computers are called servers.) What happens is that after a web site is created, it is uploaded or transferred to the hosting provider’s server. The hosting provider then allows the world to view the web site when someone types in the web address (or domain name) of the internet site. And then the site (or specifically the page) is sent to the person requesting to view the site. Essentially, web hosting can be defined as providing space on a server which allows others to view your web site.

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At Internet there is a tremendous amount of argument over which operating system is the best for web hosting. There are anti-windows haters, there are FreeBSD fanatics and more. But which is the best? The truth is it depends on what you are doing. The servers which run the web sites and the server software all run on a computer program known as the operating system. If you are running a personal computer chances are that you are running Windows ME, XP, NT or some other similiar computer program. That is the operating system of your computer. With web hosting servers they also need a operating system and there are essentially three different competing versions.

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A server is nothing more than a computer. It has a hard drive, a CPU, memory and all of the things you will generally find in a home computer. Your home computer can be a server if you want it to be. A server by definition is just a computer which serves other computers. A web hosting server is nothing more than a computer which serves web pages to the computers requesting them; i.e., to the person running the internet browser. So while in the generalist sense every computer can be a server; correspondingly what makes a computer a good server?

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by on July 9th, 2007

Web 2.0, a phrase coined by O’Reilly Media in 2003 and popularized by the first Web 2.0 conference in 2004, refers to a perceived second generation of web-based communities and hosted services — such as social-networking sites, wikis and folksonomies — which facilitate collaboration and sharing between users. O’Reilly Media titled a series of conferences around the phrase, and it has since become widely adopted.

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If you are a webmaster or intend to run a website then you will need to have a domain name. Some address. Here is a checklist which you can consider before buying a domain name. Its important from SEO point of view and from website success and popularity point of view. e.g. msn.com is really easy to digest while alta-vista-website.com is not. Consider these questions before you choose a URI (URL) for a new location (website, domain):

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